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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10204/6402

Title: Part II – The effect of data on waste behaviour: The South African waste information system
Authors: Godfrey, L
Scott, D
Difford, M
Trois, C
Keywords: Waste behaviour
Theory of planned behaviour
Waste information systems
South African waste management
Issue Date: Jun-2012
Publisher: Elsevier
Citation: Godfrey, L, Scott, D, Difford, M and Trois, C. 2012. Part II: The effect of data on waste behaviour: The South African Waste Information System. Waste Management, Vol. 32 (11), pp 2163-2176
Series/Report no.: Workflow;9877
Abstract: Combining the process of learning and the theory of planned behaviour into a new theoretical framework provides an opportunity to explore the impact of data on waste behaviour, and consequently on waste management, in South Africa. Fitting the data to the theoretical framework shows that there are only three constructs which have a significant effect on behaviour, viz experience, knowledge, and perceived behavioural control (PBC). Knowledge has a significant influence on all three of the antecedents to behavioural intention (attitude, subjective norm and PBC). However, it is PBC, and not intention, that has the greatest influence on waste behaviour. While respondents may have an intention to act, this intention does not always manifest as actual waste behaviour, suggesting limited volitional control. The theoretical framework accounts for 53.7% of the variance in behaviour, suggesting significant external influences on behaviour not accounted for in the framework. While the theoretical model remains the same, respondents in public and private organisations represent two statistically significant sub-groups in the data set. The theoretical framework accounts for 47.8% of the variance in behaviour of respondents in public waste organisations and 57.6% of the variance in behaviour of respondents in private organisations. The results suggest that respondents in public and private waste organisations are subject to different structural forces that shape knowledge, intention, and resultant waste behaviour.
Description: Copyright: 2012 Elsevier. This is the Pre/Post-print version of the work. The definitive version is published in the Journal of Waste Management, Vol. 32(11), pp 2163-2176
URI: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0956053X12002279
http://hdl.handle.net/10204/6402
ISSN: 0956-053X
Appears in Collections:Pollution and waste
General science, engineering & technology

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