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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10204/4543

Title: Economic assessment of the contribution of biological control to the management of invasive alien plants and to the protection of ecosystem services in South Africa
Authors: De Lange, WJ
Van Wilgen, BW
Keywords: Benefit cost analysi
Water resource
Biodiversity
Grazing
Invasive alien plants
Biological invasions
Issue Date: Jul-2010
Publisher: Springer
Citation: De Lange, WJ and Van Wilgen, BW. 2010. Economic assessment of the contribution of biological control to the management of invasive alien plants and to the protection of ecosystem services in South Africa. Biological Invasions, Vol 12(12), pp 4113–4124
Series/Report no.: Journal Article
Abstract: This study is a first attempt at a holistic economic evaluation of South African endeavours to manage invasive alien plants using biological control. The author’s focus was on the delivery of ecosystem services from habitats that are invaded by groups of weeds, rather than by each individual weed species. The authors established the net present value of the weed biological control efforts, and derived benefit: cost ratios by comparing this value (a cost) to the estimated value of ecosystem services protected by weed biological control. They identified four major functional groupings of invading alien plants, and assessed their impact on water resources, grazing and biodiversity. They estimated the area that remained free of invasions due to all historic control efforts in South Africa, and the proportion that remained free of invasion as a result of biological control (which was initiated in 1913). The estimated value of potential ecosystem services amounted to 152 billion South African Rands (ZAR – presently, about US$ 21 billion) annually. Although an estimated ZAR 6.5 billion was lost every year due to invading alien plants, this would have amounted to an estimated additional ZAR 41.7 billion had no control been carried out, and 5 - 75% of this protection was due to biological control. The benefit: cost ratios ranged from 50:1 for invasive sub-tropical shrubs to 3726:1 for invasive Australian trees. Benefit: cost ratios remained positive and the conclusion, that biological control has brought about a considerable level of protection of ecosystem services, remains robust even when the estimates of the economic impacts of key variables (i.e. sensitivity analyses of indeterminate variables) were substantially reduced
Description: Copyright: Springer 2010. This is the authors pre print version of the work. The definitive version is published in Biological Invasions, Vol 12(12), pp 4113–4124
URI: http://www.springerlink.com/content/w67368l7gt276245/fulltext.pdf
http://hdl.handle.net/10204/4543
ISSN: 1387-3547
Appears in Collections:Environmental and resource economics
General science, engineering & technology

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