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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10204/4465

Title: Molecular profiling techniques as tools to detect potential unintended effects in genetically engineered maize
Authors: Barros, E
Keywords: Genetically engineered plants
Genetic engineering
Food safety
Genetically engineered maize
Maize
Molecular profiling
Issue Date: May-2010
Publisher: Information Systems for Biotechnology-Virginia Tech
Citation: Barros, E. 2010. Molecular profiling techniques as tools to detect potential unintended effects in genetically engineered maize. Information systems for Biotechnology news report, pp 4-7
Series/Report no.: ISB News Report
Abstract: In the early stages of production and commercialization of foods derived from genetically engineered (GE) plants, international consensus was reached on the principles of food safety evaluation. The concept of substantial equivalence became the starting point of a safety evaluation framework, based on the idea that GE foods can be compared with analogous existing foods. However, the controversy regarding GE plants and their potential impact on human health and the environment has necessitated the development of additional methods of risk assessment. Risk assessment focuses on adverse unintended effects that could potentially result from random transgene integration. Unintended effects can also occur in conventional breeding from mutagenesis or hybridization and backcrossing. Other factors totally unrelated to genetic engineering can contribute to alterations, including plant genetic characteristics (cultivar, isogenic lines), agronomic factors (soil, fertilizers), and environmental influences (location, weather, stress). These factors need to be considered during “GE versus non-GE” evaluations. The best way to detect unintended effects is through non-targeted analysis by using profiling technologies.
Description: Copyright: 2010 Information Systems for Biotechnology-Virginia Tech
URI: www.isb.vt.edu
http://hdl.handle.net/10204/4465
Appears in Collections:Plant biotechnology
General science, engineering & technology

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