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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10204/1904

Title: Harvesting of communal resources by 'outsiders' in rural South Africa: a case of xenophobia or a real threat to sustainability?
Authors: Twine, W
Siphugu, V
Moshe, D
Keywords: Rural-urban linkages
Harvesting
Communal
Outsiders
Natural resources
Issue Date: Sep-2003
Publisher: Parthenon Publishing Group
Citation: Twine, W, Siphugu, V and Moshe, D. 2003. Harvesting of communal resources by 'outsiders' in rural South Africa: a case of xenophobia or a real threat to sustainability? International journal of sustainable development and world ecology, vol. 10(3), pp 263-274
Abstract: The harvesting of communal natural resources by 'outsiders' (i.e. harvesters from other villages or towns) was investigated in ten rural villages in South Africa. Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) techniques were used to collect data in focus groups in each village. A case study quantifying the outflow of fuel wood was also conducted in one of the villages. Harvesting by outsiders was reportedly widespread and, in the case of fuel wood, a cause for concern. Of 13 recorded resources, the three most commonly harvested by outsiders were fuel wood, plants for traditional medicine and river sand for brick-making. An increase in harvesting by outsiders over the last decade was widely reported. This was related to socio-economic changes, largely associated with the first democratic elections in 1994. Key socio-economic drivers of this increased harvesting were: 1) the breakdown of institutional control of resources, 2) rising unemployment, and 3) a pervasive sense of entitlement associated with new-found political freedom and democracy. Evidence suggests that the increased harvesting by outsiders is a reality, rather than a xenophobic accusation, and that it poses a threat to the sustainability of communal resources in rural areas. This is discussed within the context of South Africa as a society in transition.
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10204/1904
http://hdl.handle.net/10204/1904
ISSN: 1350-4509
Appears in Collections:Resource-based sustainable development
General science, engineering & technology

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