GENERAL ENQUIRIES: Tel: + 27 12 841 2911 | Email: callcentre@csir.co.za

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author Abia, ALK
dc.contributor.author Ubomba-Jaswa, Eunice
dc.contributor.author Genthe, Bettina
dc.contributor.author Momba, MNB
dc.date.accessioned 2016-12-07T07:37:48Z
dc.date.available 2016-12-07T07:37:48Z
dc.date.issued 2016-10
dc.identifier.citation Abia, A.L.K., Ubomba-Jaswa, E., Genthe, B. and Momba, M.N.B. 2016. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) shows increased public health risk associated with exposure to river water under conditions of riverbed sediment resuspension. Science of The Total Environment, 556-557, pp 1143-1151 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0048-9697
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10204/8882
dc.description Copyright: 2016 Elsevier. Due to copyright restrictions, the attached PDF file only contains the abstract of the full text item. For access to the full text item, please consult the publisher's website. The definitive version of the work is published in Science of The Total Environment, 556-557, pp 1143-1151 en_US
dc.description.abstract Although higher microbial concentrations have been reported in sediments than in the overlying water column, most quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) studies have not clearly indicated the contribution of sediment-borne pathogens to estimated risks. Thus, the present study aimed at determining the public health risk associated with exposure to pathogenic bacteria in polluted river water under undisturbed conditions and conditions of sediment resuspension in the Apies River, Gauteng, South Africa. Microbial pathogens were isolated and identified using culture and molecular methods. The beta-Poisson dose-response model was used to estimate the probability of infection (Pi) with the various pathogens, following accidental/intentional ingestion of 1 mL or 100 mL (or 50 mL) of untreated river water. Mean wet season Escherichia coli counts ranged between 5.8E + 01 and 8.8E + 04 MPN/100 mL (water column) and between 2.40E + 03 and 1.28E + 05 MPN/100 mL (sediments). Mean dry season E. coli counts ranged between 5.11E + 00 and 3.40E + 03 MPN/100 mL (water column) and between 5.09E + 00 and 6.30E + 03 MPN/100 mL (sediments). Overall (water and sediments) Vibrio cholerae was the most detected pathogen (58.8%) followed by Salmonella spp. (23.9%) and Shigella (10.1%). Ingestion of 1 mL of river water could lead to 0%–4% and 1%–74% Pi with E. coli during the dry and wet season, respectively. During the dry season, the Pi with V. cholerae, Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. were 0%–1.39%, 0%–4.11% and 0%–0.16% respectively, depending on volume of water ingested. The risks of infections with all microorganisms increased during the wet season. A 2-log increase in water E. coli count following sediments disturbance led to approximately 10 times higher Pi with E. coli than when sediments were undisturbed. Therefore, the use of the untreated water from the Apies River for drinking, household purposes or recreational activities poses a potential health risk to the users of the river. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Elsevier en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Wokflow;17332
dc.subject Developing countries en_US
dc.subject Enteropathogenic bacteria en_US
dc.subject Public health risk en_US
dc.subject Quantitative microbial risk assessment en_US
dc.subject Riverbed sediment resuspension en_US
dc.subject Water quality en_US
dc.title Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) shows increased public health risk associated with exposure to river water under conditions of riverbed sediment resuspension en_US
dc.type Article en_US


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search ResearchSpace


Advanced Search

Browse

My Account