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dc.contributor.author Goncalves, Duarte PD
dc.date.accessioned 2019-08-28T08:22:52Z
dc.date.available 2019-08-28T08:22:52Z
dc.date.issued 2019-08
dc.identifier.citation Goncalves, D. 2019. Systems thinkers: Check your scotomas and watch your language!. Cybernetics and Systems, Vol 50, pp. 609-628 en_US
dc.identifier.issn 0196-9722
dc.identifier.issn 1087-6553
dc.identifier.uri https://doi.org/10.1080/01969722.2019.1646016
dc.identifier.uri https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01969722.2019.1646016
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10204/11112
dc.description Copyright: 2019 Taylor & Francis. Due to copyright restrictions, the attached PDF file contains the abstract version of the full-text item. For access to the full-text item, please consult the publisher's website. The definitive version of the work is published in Cybernetics and Systems, Vol 50, pp. 609-628. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01969722.2019.1646016 en_US
dc.description.abstract Various belief constructs such as framing, dualisms, worldviews, paradigms, and values are discussed to understand how these might result in scotomas. The observer is not independent and objective but has purpose and values within a group with a language. This leads to an exploration of conceptual metaphor within language as a way of accessing what is largely unconscious thinking and a potential source of scotomas. Examples of the use of conceptual metaphors in systems and complexity thinking are provided illustrating that conceptual metaphors can do work that is not easily performed by other methods in systems thinking currently. Without awareness of beliefs, certain types of interactions or perspectives are neglected; patterns of behavior survive when they no longer serve; meaning is lost and marginalization continues unchecked. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher Taylor & Francis en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Workflow;22616
dc.subject Complexity thinking en_US
dc.subject Conceptual metaphors in langauge en_US
dc.subject Belief constructs en_US
dc.subject Scotomas en_US
dc.subject Systems thinking en_US
dc.title Systems thinkers: Check your scotomas and watch your language! en_US
dc.type Article en_US


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