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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10204/8934

Title: The politics of establishing catchment management agencies in South Africa: the case of the Breede-Overberg catchment management agency
Authors: Meissner, R
Funke, N
Nortje, K
Keywords: Adaptive co-management
Breede-Overberg catchment management agency
Breede-Gouritz catchment management agency
River basin organization
Issue Date: 2016
Publisher: Resilience Alliance
Citation: Meissner, R., Funke, N. and Nortje, K. 2016. The politics of establishing catchment management agencies in South Africa: the case of the Breede-Overberg catchment management agency. Ecology and Society, 21(3):26
Series/Report no.: Wokflow;17568
Abstract: We reflect on the politics of establishing catchment management agencies in South Africa with a specific focus on the Breede-Overberg Catchment Management Agency (BOCMA), which was recently replaced by the Breede-Gouritz Catchment Management Agency (BGCMA). We do so by applying the framework of adaptive comanagement and its institutional prescriptions: collaboration, experimentation, and a bioregional approach. We start by introducing the history of this catchment management agency (CMA) and then describe the establishment of CMAs in South Africa in general and that of BOCMA in particular. We follow the framework for rule types and types of river basin organizations set out by the editors of this special feature with reference to adaptive comanagement where applicable. We then discuss the politics and strategies involved in the introduction of the CMA concept to the National Water Act and the latest developments around these institutions in South Africa. This is followed by reflections on what can be surmised about BOCMA’s democratic functioning and performance to date. We conclude by reflecting on the future of operations of the new BGCMA and CMAs in South Africa in general. While our research shows that BOCMA’s establishment process has featured several elements of adaptive comanagement and its institutional prescriptions, it remains to be seen to what extent it is possible to continue implementing this concept when further developing and operationalizing the BGCMA and the country’s other CMAs.
Description: Copyright: 2016 Resilience Alliance
URI: https://www.google.co.za/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjqx-rU3vPRAhXmBsAKHaDfAMUQFggaMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ecologyandsociety.org%2Fvol21%2Fiss3%2Fart26%2FES-2016-8417.pdf&usg=AFQjCNHWcojDAXEViIrjBlIUXb_lmbp9KA&sig2=e_Gf7G3k1G_3lHBOcYgnmg
http://hdl.handle.net/10204/8934
ISSN: 1708-3087
Appears in Collections:Water resources and human health
Environmental and resource economics
General science, engineering & technology

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