DSpace
 

Researchspace >
General science, engineering & technology >
General science, engineering & technology >
General science, engineering & technology >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10204/6134

Title: Towards using tire-road contact stresses in pavement design and analysis
Authors: De Beer, M
Maina, JW
Van Rensburg, Y
Greben, JM
Keywords: Road pavement design
Strain Energy of Distortion
SED
Stress-In-Motion system
South African pavement structure
Issue Date: Sep-2011
Citation: De Beer, M, Maina, JW, Van Rensburg, Y and Greben, JM. Towards using tire-road contact stresses in pavement design and analysis. The 30th annual meeting and conference on Tire Science and Technology, Akron, Ohio, USA, 13-14 September 2011
Series/Report no.: Workflow;9353
Abstract: Optimization of road pavement design, especially towards the surface of the pavement, requires a more rational approach to modeling of truck tire-road contact stresses. Various road surfacing failures are given in this paper as examples, and it is shown that the traditional civil engineering tire model represented by a single uniformly distributed vertical contact stress of circular shape is inadequate to explain this type of surface failure. This paper therefore discusses the direct measurement of threedimensional (3D) tire pavement contact stresses using a flatbed sensor system referred to as the “Stress-In- Motion” (SIM) system. The SIM system (or device) consists of multiple conically shaped steel pins, as well as an array of instrumented sensors based on strain gauge technology. The test surface is textured with skid resistance approaching that of a dry asphalt layer. Full-scale truck tires have been tested since the mid-1990s and experience shows that 3D tire contact stresses are non-uniform and the footprint is often not of circular shape. It was found that especially the vertical shape of contact stress distribution changes, mainly as a function of tire loading. In overloaded/underinflated cases, vertical contact stresses maximize towards the edges of the tire contact patch. Higher inflation pressures at lower loads, on the other hand, result in maximum vertical stresses towards the center portion of the tire contact patch. These differences in shape and magnitude need to be incorporated into modern road pavement design. Four different tire models were used to represent a single tire type in order to demonstrate its effect on road pavement response of a typical South African pavement structure. Only applied vertical stress was used for the analyses. It was found that road surface layer life can reduce by as much as 94 percent as a result of simply using a different tire model on the same pavement structure.
Description: The 30th annual meeting and conference on Tire Science and Technology, Akron, Ohio, USA, 13-14 September 2011
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10204/6134
Appears in Collections:Infrastructure engineering
General science, engineering & technology

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
De Beer_2012.pdf5.41 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
View Statistics

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Valid XHTML 1.0! DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2010  Duraspace - Feedback