DSpace
 

Researchspace >
General science, engineering & technology >
General science, engineering & technology >
General science, engineering & technology >

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10204/6023

Title: International frameworks, national problems: mining OHS regulation in South Africa and Australia
Authors: Shaw, A
Blewett, V
Schutte, S
Keywords: Occupational health and safety
OHS
Mining safety
South African mining industry
Occupational health and safety regulatory reform
Occupational health and safety regulation
Issue Date: Dec-2011
Citation: Shaw, A, Blewett, V and Schutte, S. International frameworks, national problems: mining OHS regulation in South Africa and Australia. 34th International Conferance of Safety in Mines Research Institutes, New Delhi, India, 7-10 December 2011, pp 545-554
Series/Report no.: Workflow;6760
Abstract: Effective occupational health and safety (OHS) regulation is a critical foundation for healthy and safe mining, but the nature of the risks and the diversity of the mining industry create particular challenges for OHS regulation and enforcement. Different national and legal contexts also introduce complexity for multinational operators. For all these reasons, mining OHS regulators must develop sophisticated approaches to enforcement that enable them to respond appropriately to the range of enforcement contexts in ways that are based on sound evidence about what works. Evidence reinforces the value of an approach to enforcement that combines strategies for both deterrence (punish) and compliance (persuade). Combined strategies are more likely to have impact and are also more likely to build organisational cultures that support effective OHS management. The South African mining industry should provide an ideal environment for effective OHS regulation in a developing country. The usual confounders of poor OHS performance are not apparent in the South African mining industry. However, OHS outcomes in the South African industry are far from exemplary. Barriers to regulatory change in South Africa include the economic importance of mining and payment systems both reducing the opportunity to mobilise pressure for change; investigation and monitoring systems (both internal and external) focussed on blame-seeking; risk acceptance in a nation with major public health concerns; failure to invest in technology reducing the practicability of risk controls; and much lower social expectations of working conditions, supported by high levels of racial and gender segmentation of the mining labour market.
Description: 34th International Conferance of Safety in Mines Research Institutes, New Delhi, India, 7-10 December 2011
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10204/6023
Appears in Collections:Mining and geoscience
Human factors
General science, engineering & technology

Files in This Item:

File Description SizeFormat
Schutte_2011.pdf242.06 kBAdobe PDFView/Open
View Statistics

Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

 

Valid XHTML 1.0! DSpace Software Copyright © 2002-2010  Duraspace - Feedback