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Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10204/4463

Title: Potential solar UVR exposure health risks in South Africa
Authors: Wright, CY
Keywords: Ultraviolet radiation
UVR
Skin cancer
Melanoma
Sun exposure
SASAS conference 2010
Solar ultraviolet radiation
Issue Date: Sep-2010
Citation: Wright, CY. 2010. Potential solar UVR exposure health risks in South Africa. South African Society for Atmospheric Sciences Conference (SASAS 2010), Gariep, 21-22 September 2010, pp 2
Abstract: The detrimental effects of excess personal solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure include wrinkles, immunosuppression and skin cancer. Approximately 1 000 South Africans die each year from melanoma skin cancer and 30% of all histologically-diagnosed cancers are skin cancers, including the non-fatal non-melanoma skin cancers. Individuals with minimum natural protection from melanin, including fair skinned individuals, albinos and people spending extended periods outdoors and unprotected, are at risk. In South Africa, research has focused on analyzing ambient UVR data, UVR modelling and personal exposure patterns. Personal sun behaviour and UVR exposure patterns were analysed among a sample of Durban schoolchildren in 2001. Children received about 5% of the total daily ambient UVR and activity was the most important influencing factor. However, no publicly available research has been carried out in the past 5 years. In a rudimentary exercise, monitored ambient solar UVR levels for Pretoria, Durban and Cape Town were converted into possible child and outdoor worker exposures using the reported 5% and 20% of the total daily ambient solar UVR, respectively. Results suggest that children and outdoor workers continue to be at risk, depending on skin type, sun protection, timing and duration of exposure, and activity. Information on South African sun behavioural patterns is needed to better quantify exposure risk. Future accurate, reliable research will only be achieved when such issues are resolved and a holistic research approach may then be applied.
Description: South African Society for Atmospheric Sciences Conference (SASAS 2010), Gariep, 21-22 September 2010
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10204/4463
Appears in Collections:Environmental management
Water resources and human health
Human factors
Climate change
General science, engineering & technology

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