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dc.contributor.author Musvoto, Constansia D
dc.date.accessioned 2019-11-18T05:44:36Z
dc.date.available 2019-11-18T05:44:36Z
dc.date.issued 2019-10
dc.identifier.citation Musvoto, C.D. 2019. Climate resilience through resource efficiency in smallholder vegetable production in South Africa. In: Proceedings of the African Climate Risks Conference 2019: Dismantling Barriers to Urgent Climate Adaptation Action, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 7-9 October 2019 en_US
dc.identifier.uri https://www.africanclimaterisksconference2019.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/CONFERENCE-PROCEEDINGS.pdf
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10204/11217
dc.description Presented in: Proceedings of the African Climate Risks Conference 2019: Dismantling Barriers to Urgent Climate Adaptation Action, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 7-9 October 2019 en_US
dc.description.abstract Most of the vegetables grown in South Africa are irrigated. Smallholder vegetable farmers face water shortages and other constraints including low yields and high energy costs. This study sought to assist smallholder farmers to address these constraints through enhanced resource use efficiency. It also assessed relevance of these practices for building climate resilience. Data was collected from commercial smallholder vegetable farmers in Limpopo Province and analysed thematically. Farmers recognise the constant fluidity of their environment, noting shifts in rainfall patterns and amounts, increasing temperatures, frequent droughts; and increasing shortages of irrigation water. Higher temperatures necessitate more irrigation and exacerbate water shortages while increasing energy consumption. Competition for water from non-agricultural users is also an issue. Interventions instituted through the study include water conservation through mulching, efficient irrigation management, accurate irrigation scheduling; use of suitable infrastructure and equipment and good crop management. These interventions reduced water consumption and energy use while increasing yield and reducing production costs; and thus enhanced both water, energy and general resource use efficiency. Enhancing water, energy and general resource use efficiency are appropriate responses to climate change as they build resilience and could help sustain production in the face of climate change induced water shortages and rising energy costs. Impacts could be scaled up and sustained through training and capacity building targeted at individual farmer needs and bolstered by information and technical support. Agricultural advisory service providers need to be cognisant of opportunities for building climate resilience presented by generic problems faced by farmers. en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.publisher IEEE en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Workflow;22836
dc.subject Climate resilience en_US
dc.subject Climate risks en_US
dc.subject Efficient resource use en_US
dc.subject Vegetable production en_US
dc.subject Water shortages en_US
dc.title Climate resilience through resource efficiency in smallholder vegetable production in South Africa en_US
dc.type Presentation en_US


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